CSR Food for Thought: Do Companies Need CSR to Survive?

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CSR Food for Thought: Do Companies Need CSR to Survive?

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#CSR roundup: Articles from @PaulatImpakt @MilindaMartin @RitzCarlton and more: http://bit.ly/1qFx7cO via @VM_Solutions

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The CSR Food for Thought series is a weekly roundup of relevant news from around the Web, presented to you in one bite-sized blog post. Follow us on Twitter for CSR news and trends throughout the week: @VM_Solutions.

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Friday, December 12, 2014 - 3:30pm

In the Future, Companies Will Survive Only if They Help Solve Big Social Problems
In the year 2025, the world will look a lot different for companies, according to this article from Forbes. Paul Klein of Impakt and Milinda Martin of Time Warner Cable teamed up to research the future of CSR. Based on this research, they predict we’ll see a large shift in corporations taking ownership of social good efforts and filling in the gaps from government cuts. What do you think?

Why Social Responsibility Needs to Be More than Just a Fad
The business world currently has an “infatuation” with CSR, according to this Fast Company article. But can it last? If this is indeed a fad, then it’s temporary by definition. This article muses on how we can make CSR last by embracing its complexity.

Ritz-Carlton Takes Corporate Volunteering to New Level as Partner of IMPACT 2030
Have you heard of IMPACT 2030? It’s an initiative by corporations to help reach the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. How? Volunteerism. This article from eHotelier, a news source for the hospitality industry, highlights Ritz-Carlton’s role as a founding partner of this initiative, and summarizes their accomplishments on the recent International Volunteer Day.

Turning a Profit While Doing Good: Aligning Sustainability with Corporate Performance
New research published by The Center for Effective Public Management at Brookings backs up what we knew all along: Corporate responsibility efforts are directly related to a company’s ultimate success. Harvard Business School researcher George Serafeim found that the most successful companies undertake social good projects that are relevant to their particular industry. Find out more in the full report.

Read the original post and more on our blog: Volunteering is CSR.

Keywords: Volunteerism & Community Engagement | Business & Trade | CSR Roundup | Corporate Social Responsibility | Future of CSR | Research | Volunteer Match