New Study Reveals Long-Term Consequences of Iron Deficiency

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New Study Reveals Long-Term Consequences of Iron Deficiency

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Long-term consequences of iron deficiency revealed in new study http://3bl.me/q2d44n @Justmeans @energyrefuge #csr #health

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Tuesday, July 2, 2013 - 5:00pm

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A new study carried out by researchers from the University of Michigan, Oakland University and Instituto de Atención Pediátrica, in Costa Rica, reached some revealing conclusions regarding iron deficiency in childhood. The study was carried out with 191 infants (12-23 months old) from an urban community near San Jose, Costa Rica and is based on findings of a 25-year follow-up of the subjects involved.

Surprisingly, the researchers found social consequences connected to lack of iron during infancy. Of the 122 subjects who participated in the adult follow-up assessment, the 33 adults who suffered from the problem as infants completed one less year of schooling. Besides, they were less likely to get ahead in education or training, or even get married. Additionally, the chronically iron-deficient group rated their emotional health worse, with reports on negative emotions and detachment.

The researchers concluded that chronic iron deficiency in childhood led to poorer adult functions in most domains except for physical health and employment. "This observation suggests that poor long-term outcome, at least for overall functioning, may be prevented if iron treatment is given before iron deficiency becomes chronic and severe," said Betsy Lozoff, MD. She added it's important to prevent iron deficiency, monitor iron status, and start treatment as soon as a deficiency is detected. Outcomes were better for those who became iron-sufficient after three months of iron therapy.

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Antonio Pasolini is a Corporate Social Responsibility writer for Justmeans, Antonio Pasolini is a journalist based in Brazil who writes about alternative energy, green living and sustainability. He also edits Energyrefuge.com, a top web destination for news and comment on renewable energy and Elpis.org, a recycled paper bag/magazine distributed from health food stores in London, formerly his hometown for over a decade. He is also a happy herbivore.

 
Keywords: Health & Healthcare | Children | Instituto de Atención Pediátrica | Iron Deficiency | Oakland University | childhood | csr | iron | university of michigan

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