Testing New Leak Technologies in Gas Transportation

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Testing New Leak Technologies in Gas Transportation

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Testing New Leak Technologies in Gas Transportation http://3bl.me/pmvh2v @enbridge
Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 3:15pm

CAMPAIGN: About our Pipelines

CONTENT: Article

Last summer Enbridge’s Gas Transportation (GT) business was at the center of a major field demonstration showcasing some of latest technology in leak detection.

In June, GT welcomed vendors and experts from Petroleum Research Council International (PRCI), industry and other areas of Enbridge to the field trial at Mineral Wells, Texas.  Here, testing involved controlled, simulated gas leaks along a stretch of GT’s gas transmission pipeline network.  One of the vendor companies used laser technology to detect gas emissions, while another used reflected refracted sunlight, measuring changes in the quality of light to detect leaks. Yet another used a gas-sniffing device to take air samples to detect traces of gas indicating a possible leak.

“We were interested in finding out what new technologies would work best for Enbridge and the industry. These technologies could provide massive data sets on possible emissions sources, ground subsidence and activity near our pipelines,” says Bryan MacKenzie, GT’s Superintendent of Systems Integrity and the person who project managed the event in partnership with PRCI, the U.S.-based pipeline research foundation. 

It’s not by accident that the test occurred at GT.  Already the U.S. business unit, with the help its System Integrity group, has demonstrated a keen appetite to support the development of new innovative leak detection technologies.

“Leak detection is one of the keys to a well-run and prudent pipeline operation. We need to continually look at what technologies are out there to keep pipeline integrity at the forefront,” says MacKenzie, whose 13-person group of corrosion specialists, engineers, data analysts and project managers provides a centre of leak detection expertise to other areas of the GT business.

Currently System Integrity is exploring the application of SmartBall technology, which was originally developed for water pipes.

“We’re working with a vendor to potentially run SmartBall sensors on our gas pipelines as a way to find small internal corrosion leaks,” explains MacKenzie.

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Keywords: Enbridge | leak detection | leak technologies | pipeline integrity

CAMPAIGN: About our Pipelines

CONTENT: Article

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