Health Correlation Between Partners Raises Policy Questions

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Health Correlation Between Partners Raises Policy Questions

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The correlation between the health of partners raises policy questions http://3bl.me/cpwxe2 the latest #Health Minute from @3BLMedia

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Tuesday, July 16, 2013 - 10:00am

CONTENT: Press Release

In the current, ongoing debate over the Affordable Care Act, a 2002 study that revealed a major implication for U.S. health care policy has resurfaced. Its conclusion? That partners, people in relationships, tend to be either both healthy or both sick. That’s according to researchers at Brigham Young University, who asked 4,700 couples over the age of 50: “if you are married, how do you rate your health relative to your partner’s?” They found that health status tended to correlate between partners. Those in excellent health had an overwhelming chance of having a partner in excellent health, and only a two percent chance of having one in poor health. Those in poor health had a 13 percent chance of having a partner in poor health. There are some obvious underlying reasons for these results. Couples share the same living environment and often make similar health choices, from diet to exercise. And people tend to marry those of similar education and economic status, two factors that are strong indicators for health status. The BYU researchers’ finding contains an evidence-based suggestion for better U.S. health care: that a comprehensive health policy should be shaped around family units rather than individuals.

I’m John Howell for 3BL Media

For more on this and other stories, go to 3blmedia.com

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Keywords: 3bl media. partners | Affordable Care Act | Health | Health Minute | Relationships | U.S. health care policy | policy

CONTENT: Press Release

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