3BL Blogs: A Little Less Conversation, A Little More Action Please

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Keywords: Business | CSR | Communities | Environmental Defense Fund | Sierra Club | Sustainability | Triple Bottom Line | Woods Institute at Stanford | World Wildlife Fund

3BL Blogs: A Little Less Conversation, A Little More Action Please

The Changebase was founded by Ashley Parsons Jablow, a former nonprofit fundraiser and current MBA student/corporate philanthropy intern.
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When it Comes to the topic of Sustainability: A Little Less Conversation, A Little More Action Please http://3bl.me/mywmmm

Summary

The 3BL Media blog roll is a select list of the most influential, respected, and authoritative voices in corporate social responsibility. Compiled from the 3BL Media staff’s extensive contacts with longtime CSR commentators, these bloggers offer relevant news, opinions, and ideas about all things CSR in one convenient place.

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Tuesday, August 11, 2009 - 6:13pm

This time around I want to share some thoughts and ideas that came up for me this week about CSR and the conversations we have about it (and as a preview, if you keep reading, you’ll get to hear what Elvis Presley thinks of sustainability).

The other day I had the chance to sit in on a conference call and presentation hosted by the Stanford Graduate School of Business Office of Executive Education and their Business Strategies for Environmental Sustainability (BSES) program. Part presentation and part sales pitch for the upcoming BSES in October, the webinar entitled “Sustainability Matters” was hosted by Professor William Barnett, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute at Stanford and Director of the BSES program.

Professor Barnett started out with a discussion of the Kuna Indian Nation living off the coast of Panama. According to Barnett, the Kuna demonstrate the harmony that can exist between indigenous people and their natural environment. They’ve lived a seemingly isolated existence in which they’ve developed incredibly sustainable farming practices without influence from the outside world.

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