Anvil Knitwear: Where Style, Sustainability and Environmental Efforts Collide!

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Anvil Knitwear: Where Style, Sustainability and Environmental Efforts Collide!

Check out how this eco-friendly company produces sustainable clothing and promotes environmentalism.
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Friday, February 5, 2010 - 10:00am

CONTENT: Blog

Check out how this eco-friendly company produces sustainable clothing and promotes environmentalism.

There are many companies out there who say that they care about the environment, yet they crank out processed products from carbon emitting factories on a daily basis. Their clothing is full of harmful dyes and their workers earn toxic wages. I don’t think that it’s fair to say that you “go green” when may make a few efforts to recycle but you make no effort to directly help the people living on your planet.

That’s why I love the Anvil Knitwear Company. The company works towards reducing its impact on the environment and supports humanitarian efforts, while also creating comfy and eco-friendly clothing and accessories.

We featured a few blog posts on Anvil a while ago, such as Anvil becoming the official t-shirt and knitwear sponsor for Earth Day Network and the company launching new t-shirts made from recycled plastic bottles.  The latest news on the company is that it recently teamed with British fashion designer Vivienne Westwood to create an eco-friendly shirt that says: "ACT FAST/SLOW DOWN and stop climate change. That's the message. We must all commit ourselves. Say YES to the Rainforest."

The purpose of the shirt is to promote the idea of REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation), a conservation effort created by the United Nations that wants to issue carbon credits for each hectare of living rainforest. These credits would then be traded to other countries that need to reduce their carbon emissions. The added bonus is that all of the proceeds would go to poor landowners who have no choice but to cut down their own trees to make a decent living.

The shirt is made from recycled polyester that comes from recycled plastic bottles and organic cotton. Check out the new design.

Now that you know about the t-shirt, wouldn’t it be cool if you could also find out about how the shirt was made? Well apparently you can! Anvil Knitwear teamed with AgencyNet to create TrackMyT.com, a website that lets you track the origins of your shirt, from the farm where the cotton came from to the store it was delivered to. Here’s a cool video about TrackMyT.

I told you about how the company is going green by creating recycled t-shirts, and now I want to share news about Anvil’s efforts to support the children of Haiti. Last January the company joined in the fundraising initiatives for The Rural Haiti Project, an organization dedicated to helping low-income and at-risk children of Haiti become successful leaders and builders of their communities.

The children associated with the project have all been subjected to poverty, violence and environmental deprivation, and the goal is to help them to build the confidence and creative-thinking skills that they need to promote positive change in Haiti. Right now the Rural Haiti Project is delivering food and first aid to communities in Haiti that were damaged by the devastating earthquake, so there’s no better time to support this initiative than now.

As you can see, Anvil Knitwear is truly a green company that cares about the quality of its products and the impact of its environmental efforts. Go ahead and check out some items and see how you can help a fellow man or a fellow rainforest!

Greenopolis.com is dedicated to our users. We focus our attention on changing the world through recycling, waste-to-energy and conservation. We reward our users for their sustainable behaviors on our website, through our Greenopolis Tracking Stations and with curbside recycling programs.

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Keywords: anvil | anvil knitwear | t-shirts | the rural haiti project | trackmyt.com

CONTENT: Blog

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