Electrical Public Safety at American Electric Power

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Electrical Public Safety at American Electric Power

Keeping the public safe around electricity is a priority for AEP. We work to proactively educate various at-risk public groups such as first responders, commercial contractors and children about the potential dangers of electricity. We conduct proactive outreach and offer numerous resources and online tools, including an electrical safety e-learning module, videos and factsheets about electrical safety.

Informing the public about how to properly handle certain situations involving electric is important.  Recent severe weather conditions have caused downed power lines and we want you to know what to do if you come across a downed wire.  Do you know what to do if a power is down in your front yard?  Today's tough economic conditions are resulting in AEP experiencing an increase is copper theft.  Copper theft is not only illegal, it can cause severe injury or even death.  Please don't go near distribution poles, power lines or electrical substations.

This series of five chapters will introduce to electricity, how it is generated, how it arrives at your home or business and provides key safety tips.  We invite you to watch each of the short videos and learn about this vital resource.

FMRs from this campaign

Electrical Public Safety at American Electric Power - Metal Theft Case
 Reporting metal theft can help to save lives and stop this deadly crime. Indications of metal theft include: Missing sections of power lines or ground wires Power lines hanging in the air or lying on the ground Missing or misaligned covers to underground vaults Cut fences or locks near electric substations Holes dug underneath fences Suspicious or unauthorized persons near substations Individuals carrying large bundles of wire   ABOUT AEP - American Electric Power AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.   AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas).   AEP15487
Jul 28, 2011 8:00 AM ET
Electrical Public Safety at American Electric Power - Planning is essential before digging in your yard
Planning is essential for safe digging, especially because you must call AT LEAST 48 hours before you plan to dig. After calling 811, utilities have at least 48 hours to come out and mark their lines with a color-coded paint or flagging system. Red indicates electric power lines, conduit and cables. Yellow represents gas, oil, petroleum or gaseous materials. Orange is used for communication, alarm or signal lines. Blue is the color used to indicate potable water. Purple is reclaimed water, irrigation and slurry lines. Green is the color for sewers and drain lines. Pink is used to indicate temporary survey markings. White is used before the locating services to mark the proposed excavating site.   Learn more about the 811 process in this informational video.   ABOUT AEP - American Electric Power AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.   AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas).  AEP15480
Jul 27, 2011 8:00 AM ET
Electrical Public Safety at American Electric Power - Underground Line Safety
Know what’s below. Call 811 before you dig. Did you know that a simple job like planting a tree in your yard can jeopardize your safety? Many energized power and utility lines are buried just a few feet under the ground. Digging, trenching or excavating without knowing where utility lines are buried could be costly... and fatal. Before you dig, protect yourself and call 811 to have the...
Jul 25, 2011 2:00 PM ET
Electrical Public Safety at American Electric Power - Minimum Safe Distances from Overhead Power Lines
Keep away from overhead power lines.  Keep long tools, ladders, scaffolding and other equipment away from overhead lines.  Minimum safe distances increase as line voltage increases.  Weather conditions and other factors also can affect safe distances. The following minimum safe distances are based on line voltage: Up to 50,000 volts (typical over head line) - Minumum clearance is 10 feet 50,000 volts to 200,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 15 feet 200,000 volts to 350,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 20 feet 350,000 volts to 500,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 25 feet 500,000 volts to 700,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 35 feet 750,000 volts to 1,000,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 45 feet ABOUT AEP - American Electric Power AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined. AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas). AEP15439
Jul 25, 2011 8:30 AM ET
AEP's Advice to the Public: Dangers of Overhead Power Lines
  Most contact with overhead power lines is accidental, but can result in severe injuries and even death.  Fortunately, most, if not all, electrical accidents can be prevented.  Before you begin any job, whether it's installing a TV antenna on your roof or constructing a new building, it's important to be aware of power line locations and the necessary safety precautions.  This...
Jul 22, 2011 2:00 PM ET

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