Erb Institute Student, Jim Gawron, Part of Research Team on Maximizing the Benefits of Autonomous Vehicles

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Erb Institute Student, Jim Gawron, Part of Research Team on Maximizing the Benefits of Autonomous Vehicles

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READ: Are autonomous vehicles energy efficient? The answer may surprise you! New research by @UMich @erbinstitute student @jim_gawron in @EnvSciTech @UMichResearch @UMichiganNews http://myumi.ch/J7Rgg

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A specially equipped Lincoln MKZ, based at Mcity, is an open-source connected and automated research vehicle available to U-M faculty and students, startups and others to help accelerate innovation. Image credit: University of Michigan

Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 10:05am

ANN ARBOR—The added weight, electricity demand and aerodynamic drag of the sensors and computers used in autonomous vehicles are significant contributors to their lifetime energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study.

However, when savings from the driving efficiencies associated with self-driving vehicles are factored into the equation, the net result is a reduction in lifetime energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions of up to 9 percent compared to the conventional vehicles examined in the University of Michigan-led study.

“This study explored the tradeoffs between the increased environmental impacts from adding autonomous vehicle equipment with the expected gains in driving efficiency,” said study co-author Gregory Keoleian, director of the Center for Sustainable Systems at U-M’s School for Environment and Sustainability.

“Our findings highlight the need to focus on energy efficiency when designing autonomous vehicles so that the full environmental benefits of this emerging, transformative technology can be realized. We hope this work contributes to a more sustainable mobility ecosystem.”

The findings were published online on Feb. 15 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. The research was supported by grants from the Ford Motor Co.

The study is a detailed assessment of the lifetime contributions of the sensing and computing subsystems in autonomous vehicles to energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions. These vehicles, formally known as connected and automated vehicles or CAVs, often include multiple cameras, sonar, radar, LiDAR, a GPS navigation system, a computer and support structures.

The researchers looked at two types of CAVs: those powered by internal combustion engines and battery-powered electric vehicles. The two vehicle types were paired with sensing and computer subsystems of three sizes (small, medium and large) to create six scenarios.

Life-cycle assessment methodology was then used to estimate lifetime energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for each scenario, from cradle to grave.

One key finding is that autonomous vehicles with electric powertrains have lifetime greenhouse gas emissions that are 40 percent lower than vehicles powered by internal-combustion engines. The lower emissions result from the inefficiencies involved in producing electricity from fuel combustion, as well as a sharper fuel-consumption increase when extra mass is added to a vehicle powered by an internal-combustion engine.

Read the article in Michigan News here.