The Neuroscience of Corporate Goodness and Employee Engagement

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The Neuroscience of Corporate Goodness and Employee Engagement

The “hug drug” may be the key to changing the world for the better

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Scientific fact: humans are hardwired to help others. @benevity's Founder and CEO explains the neuroscience behind why it feels so good to give and how companies can engage their people with a regular dose of the “hug drug”. http://bit.ly/2j1RaSl
Friday, December 15, 2017 - 7:45am

CAMPAIGN: Workplace Giving Success Strategies

CONTENT: Blog

Anthropologists tell us that humanity’s secret to success as a species has been our ability to collaborate and cooperate to ensure the survival of the family, the tribe, the nation or whatever group we are closely affiliated with. Contrary to what many would have us believe, we’ve evolved to cooperate, not compete. In other words, we’re hardwired to help others.

Recent studies in the areas of behavioral science, behavioral economics and neuroscience chalk a lot of this up to a powerful hormone called oxytocin, playfully known as the “hug drug” or the “moral molecule”. Oxytocin was discovered in 1906 and is commonly associated with the biological processes involved in childbirth. It has long been thought to play a pivotal role in the bonding of mothers and children, and is often associated with feelings of tranquility, serenity or inner peace.

DISCOVER HOW THE "HUG DRUG" CAN HELP EMPLOYEES ATTAIN A SENSE OF PURPOSE AND DEEP EMOTIONAL CONNECTION TO THEIR EMPLOYER AND COLLEAGUES.

Keywords: Social Impact & Volunteering | Brands with a Purpose | Corporate Social Responsibility | Employee Engagement | Employee Giving | Oxytocin | Philanthropy & Cause Initiatives | Prosocial | Purpose at Work | Research, Reports & Publications | Responsible Business & Employee Engagement

CAMPAIGN: Workplace Giving Success Strategies

CONTENT: Blog